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Bienal de Mujeres

Presentations

Imi Knoebel: Graphic ArtworkNovember 2005–April 2006

Imi Knoebel is the pseudonym of Wolf Knoebel. Born in Dessau in 1940, Knoebel is regarded as being among the hundred most important artists on the contemporary international art scene.

Knoebel’s work is to be found in important museums such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Beacon in New York, Madrid’s Reina Sofía and the Nationalgalerie in Berlin, as well as in the principal international art fairs of Frieze, Basel, The Armory Show, Arco, etc).

A Disciple of Joseph Beuys and friend of Imi Giese and Blinky Palermo, the artist’s inspiration was Malevich’s Suprematism, especially his Black Square, and the influence of Russian Constructivism.

He has the feel of a craftsman. He once said that he would have preferred to have been a farmer instead of an artist. Even as a young man he imagined a future where “the work of an artist would be as mundane as that of a farmer, carpenter or architect.”

His pictorial work has a sculptural aspect that dilutes the concepts of painting, installation and sculpture.

In Knoebel’s works, there is a material superimposition of forms, lines, and colours, giving it a three-dimensional feel that is both real and virtual. His processes for exploring structure, based on the principle of crop rotation, generate a picture of four pictorial fields that are both uniform yet disparate. In order to achieve maximum performance with the minimum input, Knoebel cultivates his art along these economic principles.

Since 1976 he has presented more that 2000 combinations on paper with five or six uniform rectangular fields that are like playing cards in a game without end that toys with structure.

Knoebel’s powerful palette enjoys a sensuality that combines subtle, delicate, brilliant and elegant colours.

Imi Knoebel solves the transfer of the above factors to graphic arts and onto paper with a masterful touch.

We are pleased to present the ATAAAA, 2003 series, a limited edition of only 6 in acrylic on paper achieving, through the superimposition of flat elements, an effect of depth and the object-like nature of the works he creates in other materials.