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Bienal de Mujeres

Presentations

Natalia Latorre: Suite FemeninoSeptember 2012–December 2012

Title
Suite Femenino
Numbered
49/75
Year
2011
Technique
Linoleum cut
Award
First Prize. Graphic Art Award for Young Artists. Calcografía Nacional. Madrid
Title
Suite Femenino II
Numbered
2/20
Year
2011
Technique
Linoleum cut
Award
Honorable Mention. XII José Caballero Print Award. Las Rozas. Madrid
Title
Suite Femenino III
Numbered
4/20
Year
2011
Technique
Linoleum cut
Title
Suite Femenino IV
Numbered
2/20
Year
2011
Technique
Linoleum cut and embossing
Title
Suite Femenino V
Numbered
5/20
Year
2011
Technique
Linoleum cut
Award
First Prize. XII San Lorenzo El Escorial Print Award. Madrid
Title
Suite Femenino VI
Numbered
3/20
Year
2012
Technique
Linoleum cut
Award
Honorable Mention. XIX National Print Award of Marbella. Museo del Grabado Español Contemporáneo. Marbella. Málaga
Title
Suite Femenino VII
Numbered
2/20
Year
2012
Technique
Linoleum cut

Natalia Latorre (Cartagena, 1990) is a young artist who lives and works in Madrid.

Her relationship with prints began in 2008, when she enrolled in a printmaking and graphic design course at the Escuela de la Real Casa de la Moneda of Madrid. Suite Femenino is her final year project, which she has been enriching and expanding since then.

The seven linoleum cuts which make up this series have been awarded the Certamen de Arte Gráfico para Jóvenes Creadores de la Calcografía Nacional, the XII Certamen de Grabado José Caballero, the XIX Premios Nacionales de Grabado de Marbella and the XII Certamen de Grabado San Lorenzo El Escorial, amongst others.

In this series, Natalia Latorre shows a selection of works of great precision which reflects the delicacy of women’s underwear she is inspired by. In Natalia’s hands these undergarments are elegant, although some of them could be considered vulgar.

All the items selected for this suite have evolved and have been a milestone, not only in fashion but also in the history of female seduction. Each of them has its own story that helps to tell a greater one: old shops from the middle of the XIX century, famous brands from the 1950’s and the latest spring-summer collection of a multinational. They also have an owner, who shall remain nameless.

The artist admits: “The concept is based on Pop art, not because its aesthetic, but because an everyday object is promoted to a higher level.”

Natalia Latorre offers a woman’s point of view of female undergarments but she points out: “The work as a whole, far from being a feminist vision, attempts to remind us that today as we are so focused on the importance of gender, we tend to forget our individuality and have skipped this female side, this unique side.”